Do Afghan Hounds Shed? What You Need to Know

Afghan Hounds truly are a sight to behold, some might say majestic.

With a long, flowing coat and a calm, somewhat aloof demeanor, they truly are in a class of their own. But the question you really need to be answered is: do they shed much?

No, Afghan Hounds do not shed much at all. Their long, silky hair is somewhat similar to human hair in that it keeps on growing, though, so they are a fairly high-maintenance breed when it comes to grooming. But that’s a small price to pay for a virtually non-shedding dog, especially when you consider how awesome and unique this dog is.

In this post, I’ll show you what you need to know about the Afghan Hound, including its shedding and grooming traits, so you know what to expect if you decide to adopt.

About Afghan Hounds

As the name suggests, this breed originates from Afghanistan. They are also among some of the oldest breeds known to man.

They aren’t just ‘glamour dogs’ either, as many people believe. These guys are part of the sighthound breed which means they are actually full-blown hunters!

They’ve been crowned with taking down some serious game across the mountainous regions of Afghanistan, Northern India, and Pakistan back in the day, primarily due to their keen eyesight and speed.

Fast forward to the present day, though, and not many folks know them as skilled hunters. After making their way out of the middle east with British soldiers back in the 19th century, they’ve slowly become domesticated dogs known for their amazing coats.

Afghan Hound Coat Card

Afghan Hound dog runs on green grass.
Coat type:Single coat
Texture:Fine and silky
Length:Long hair
Color:Commonly black, white, and tan
Shedding:Low-shedding
Grooming:High-maintenance

Afghan Hounds are characterized by long, flowing, silky hair and hold themselves in an almost ‘kingly’ manner. The hair on the face is short, while the rest of the body is covered in long, fine, silky hair, which is often longer around the ears.

The most common colors you’ll find in this breed are black, white, and tan, but they come in just about every variation other than spotted.

Afghan Hound Shedding Traits

1/5
Shedding Level

This breed has one coat as opposed to other breeds, which have both a topcoat and an undercoat. As a result, they don’t shed as heavily as other breeds.

Their coat is more like human hair because it’s in a constant state of growth and needs regular trimming, much like our hair does. This means the coat doesn’t reach the “shedding phase” as often as the majority of breeds and thus sheds less.

When you are gauging how much a particular dog sheds, it also pays to know how they transition from pup to adult. In this case, the Afghan pups look almost nothing like they do when they become adults.

Pups are characterized by short, fluffy fur which starts to fall out between 9-12 months of age, at which time the new (much longer) coat begins to grow through.

It is during the transition between pup and adulthood when things tend to get a bit messy! The one-year mark typically represents a lot of extra shedding as the old coat falls out and the new coat begins to grow. This also means extra grooming to deal with knots, mats, and all kinds of crazy tangles. But it’s only short term, so don’t stress!

Grooming Your Afghan Hound

5/5
Grooming Effort

You may have thought you’d struck gold with the low shedding, right?

Well, now it’s time for the bad news…. (well, kinda).

Afghan Hounds may not shed a lot of hair, but they are a very high-maintenance breed in terms of grooming. In fact, they are among the highest maintenance of all breeds when it comes to grooming. Although not the worst either. It’s more a case of consistency than difficulty.

Either way, they do require weekly or bi-weekly baths and regular brushing to remove and reduce the occurrence of mats and tangles. It’s really the length of the hair that causes this because sticks, mud, and all kinds of things can become intertwined in their coat.

Given the volume of bathing, it is also very important to look for a shampoo (like oatmeal) that won’t dry out your dog’s skin. Over bathing can cause dry, irritated skin, which can lead to excess shedding. It may even be worth bathing in plain old water every other week to avoid irritation. Consult your local grooming professional, though, if you have any concerns.

Conclusion

The Afghan Hound is a really interesting breed. On the one hand, they have an incredible hunting ability and can tear shreds off much larger prey. But on the other hand, they win awards for having particularly glamorous coats!

They’ve got the best of both worlds, so it’s no wonder they have such a calm, dominating spirit, and many refer to them as “kingly” dogs. 

More importantly, they are definitely considered to be among the low shedding breeds, so you won’t have to deal with crazy amounts of hair throughout your home. As mentioned, though, they are quite high maintenance in the grooming department, so it’s a bit of a tradeoff.

Either way, the Afghan Hound is a remarkable breed that’s sure to be a welcome addition to any home, and I hope this post has helped make your decision a bit easier.

Do Afghan Hounds Shed? What You Need to Know

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